Manual de instrucciones - Pizzicato 3.6 ES560 - Revisión del 20/06/2013

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Reading and writing Midi files

Los temas cubiertos:

Vea también el siguiente vídeo:


The Midi file [Light] [Principiante] [Profesional] [Escritura] [Composición Light] [Composición Pro] [Percusión] [Guitarra] [Coro] [Teclado] [Solista]

A MIDI file is a file which contains Midi information organized to form a full piece of music. It contains one or more time sequences of MIDI instructions which describe when and how the notes of the score must be played. Other information specify which instruments play, volumes, various controllers and other MIDI messages.

The MIDI file is a universal format of musical data exchange between various devices and computers. Pizzicato, as most musical software, reads and writes MIDI files (except Pizzicato Light, which does not read them). This is used to exchange music documents between Pizzicato and other musical software by going through the MIDI format.

You need to understand very well that the musical contents of a MIDI file contains only the start, the duration, the force and the pitch of each played note. It is a succession of instructions like this:

It is the equivalent of information sent by your musical keyboard to Pizzicato when you record a score in real time.

The graphic aspect of the score is not included in a MIDI file. Let us take a simple example to explain this difference. Let us consider the 3 following measures:

The display is quite different for each but when they are played, these 3 measures are strictly identical. The MIDI files will be the same for the three measures.

When you save a Midi file, you lose all information concerning the graphic aspect of the score. Only the data strictly necessary to play the score are recorded.

For this reason, the writing and reading of MIDI files is useful only when you must exchange files with another software. You will also find MIDI files libraries in the trade and on the Internet, and you can read them in Pizzicato.

By default, when you open a MIDI file, Pizzicato will first associate the notes in the tracks with each staff of the document. Then it will automatically transcribe the notes and display the score. If you do not want to automatically transcribe a MIDI file into notes, use the Options menu, Additional options... item and disable the corresponding check box. In such a case, to see the notes in the measures, you need to transcribe the tracks in musical notation: select all measures and use the Transcribe item in the Edit menu.

Three formats exist for a MIDI file. Format 0 contains only one track with all notes together. Format 1 contains one or more tracks grouping all notes of a staff. Format 2 is rather rare and contains several independent sequences. Pizzicato reads and writes formats 0 and 1.

Exporting a Midi file [Light] [Principiante] [Profesional] [Escritura] [Composición Light] [Composición Pro] [Percusión] [Guitarra] [Coro] [Teclado] [Solista]

Listen to it and observe the way in which notes are graphically displayed. We will save it in a MIDI file. In the following section, we will open the MIDI file to transform it back into a score.

Three choices lets you select between the full 0 format (with the notes), the 0 format with only tempo information (quite rare), or the full 1 format. The advised choice (and also the default choice) is format 1. Click Export. Pizzicato asks you a file name. Fill in Test and click Save. Pizzicato saves the MIDI file and the export is finished.

Starting with Pizzicato 3.5.3, you can select the staves that are exported to the MIDI file, with the "J" checkbox that you find in the instruments window. This checkbox specifies which instrument is played and also exported in MIDI.

Importing a Midi file [Principiante] [Profesional] [Escritura] [Composición Light] [Composición Pro] [Percusión] [Guitarra] [Coro] [Teclado] [Solista]

The four central options are only available in the more advanced versions of Pizzicato. Here are the options:

In this precise case, the main difference with the original score is the way in which the beams and the stems of notes are presented. This kind of information is not stored in a MIDI file and Pizzicato simply recreates them from scratch.

When you import a MIDI file and use the transcription, Pizzicato takes into account the parameters contained in the transcription options dialog box, exactly as explained in the lesson about transcription. You can then save the result using the Save item in the File menu.

Remarks :


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Light

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Guitarra

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